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    Sheetz Deals With Local Gasoline Shortage

    Some Sheetz sites in Pennsylvania are still waiting for shipments.
     

    ALTOONA, Pa. -- Three weeks after Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc across the Northeast -- most notably New York and New Jersey -- its resulting gas problems have spread to Pennsylvania.

    Altoona, Pa. -based Sheetz Inc. has experienced gas shortages at several locations across Pennsylvania this past weekend. The convenience store retailer has made some gas deliveries -- stores in Manchester and Chambersburg have received shipments -- but as of Sunday other locations are still facing shortages, according to the York Daily Record.

    "We are still diligently working to get all affected stores supply as soon as possible," Sheetz spokeswoman Monica Jones told the newspaper.

    According to media reports, Sheetz locations experienced a shortage of 87 octane gasoline, which led to shortages of 89 octane gasoline. Sheetz still had 92 octane in most of its stores Sunday.

    No stores were closed due to the gas woes, nor did Sheetz impose any gas rationing or limits on how much motorists could buy.

    Sheetz was not the only Pennsylvania-based retailer to grapple with delayed gas issues following the Oct. 29 storm. Rutter's CEO Scott Hartman told the York Daily Record that Rutter's Farm Stores have gas but it took some work.

    "We've been scrambling for the last two weeks. As of Friday, we were touch and go there for a while -- but we managed to find enough for the weekend. ... We've had trucks going to all sorts of places we don't normally go to get gas," he told the newspaper over the weekend.

    The shortages at Sheetz added to concerns that Rutter's locations might not be able to handle the extra traffic from motorists looking to fill up. However, Hartman said he expected another shipment of gas late Monday night.

    Hartman traced the problem back to the shutdown of a major gas pipeline that runs from Baltimore to New York, and stops in Philadelphia, in anticipation of then-oncoming Sandy. One of that pipeline's main arteries runs from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, and supplies Rutter's, Hartman said. The pipeline has since been reactivated.

     

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