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    McDonald's Debuts New Packages

    Fast-food chain is revamping its packaging to be eco-friendly and promote high quality.

    OAK BROOK, Ill. -- Consumers may have a sense of déjà vu when they look at the bag holding their Big Mac. McDonald’s recently announced that 82 percent of its packaging in its nine largest markets is now made from renewable materials.

    As part of its fourth Corporate Responsibility Report themed "Responsible Food for a Sustainable Future," McDonald’s put the spotlight on its current and future eco-friendly efforts. It has pledged to continue to focus on energy efficiency, sustainable packaging, waste management and green restaurant design, Brandweek reported.

    "At McDonald’s, continuously improving our social and environmental performance is a key component of our continued success as a company and central to our commitment to using our size and scope to make the world a better place," McDonald’s CEO Jim Skinner said in a statement cited by Brandweek.

    Beginning next month, the chain will change the look of its packaging in all 118 McDonald's countries. The burger chain will promote the brand’s high-quality ingredients through "sophisticated graphics, photography and storytelling," per the company.

    More than 91 percent of the fish used in its products originate from sustainable fisheries and, as part of its rainforest commitment policy, it continues to refuse beef sourced from rainforest areas. Nearly all (99 percent) of its approved slaughterhouses were audited for animal welfare in 2007, and 99.2 percent of those passed, the report stated.

    Seven of its nine largest markets have introduced the “Environmental Scorecard” to their suppliers. And, 92 percent of its food, packaging and tier-1 equipment suppliers have affirmed its code of conduct, which focuses on reducing water, energy, air and waste impact.

    McDonald's currently has green restaurants in the U.S. and Sweden, and is constructing more in Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica and France.

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